ITSinsider is Heading to… Paper.

Early this morning around 3am,  in the throes of insomnia, I finished listening to Ed Snowden’s interview with Kara Swisher. It was one of the many interviews he’s been giving about his new book, “Permanent Record.” Like Swisher, I honed in on his “romantic” attachment to the early Internet and what the space meant to him as a young adolescent, and perhaps what he still thinks it can be today, presumably, if people will just do the right thing and stop using their power for no good.

Oy. Good luck with that. I’m on #TeamSnowden at least in the same way Swisher is. At the very least, he succeeded in ratcheting up my interest in reading his book.

I started the ITSinsider blog in January 2006. To refresh your memories, that was before the first iPhone release. I had no idea what I was going to write about, nor did I have any idea what a blog was or how to do it. I only knew I had to write my way into remaking a career for myself after being a stay-at-home Mom for five years. Being out of the technology field for five years was like being in a cave for 50 years. The catch-up factor was ~10x. I struggled to become relevant in those early days. But, eventually I did. It’s amusing to read how I did that in the early entries on this blog.*

I found my footing in the dawn of the web 2.0 phenomenon that morphed into the “enterprise 2.0” movement. I’d like to think I helped shape that movement. Like the young Snowden, I had an idealistic, altruistic belief in the goodness of decent people to share and collaborate for a better world.  I encouraged hundreds of corporate professionals to attempt to “#changetheworldFTW.”** In their own ways, they did. I have receipts.

My former colleague and friend, Dion Hinchcliffe, recently presented at a digital workforce conference and announced to his audience that, “For the first time in human history, we are all connected.” And more importantly, he noted this milestone as, “An Unprecedented Power of Incalculable Value.”

I could not agree more with Dion. But maybe not for the same reason. I love seeing the enthusiasm on the social web for all things “digital workplace.” I love seeing my friends making inroads with these revolutionary concepts including collaboration, transparency, trust, and breaking down silos.

From the very beginning, although I believed that these new tools and philosophies would lead to accelerated innovation and profitability, privately I always hoped greater transparency would deliver a greater sense of responsibility. I hoped that as professionals had more views and access into the goings-on of the corporate machine, they’d begin to question upper level management decisions and their personal role in any harm their companies were committing in the pursuit of profit. That twang of guilt is the seed of real systemic change. In this way, I think about Snowden and other whistleblowers who’ve come forward.

More recently, I enjoyed learning that the employees of Facebook are using its social collaboration network, Facebook Workplace, to voice their dissent over the company’s policy to allow false advertising on its platform.

The Internet of 2019 headed into 2020 is a far different place than when I first wrote about it in 1984. The best education that came from those decades of web maturity was not learning about the technology, it was learning about humanity. It revealed who we are. The good, bad, and the ugly.

I’m no longer an “insider” in tech. I’m very much an outsider. I’m grateful to the field of technology for my long-tenured career and the many adventures it afforded me. This blog will now retire and, ironically, turn from 1s and 0s to paper. I will create a volume of books out of the 125K words of this blog, so I have a permanent record of this exciting and important second wave of my career. I’ll put it on my bookshelf and look at it from time to time. Of course, you can buy a copy if you’d like.

Thanks for being a reader these many years. I’ve enjoyed writing for you here. You can find me writing today on Medium and on my personal blog. If you want the brave stuff, I’m writing on Patreon now too. I’m not writing about tech, but I’ll still be writing for many more years to come.

Namaste.


*In reviewing my early posts, I realize I have a lot of men to thank for my comeback in tech. That’s a tough circle to square. I highly recommend every woman in tech my age near retirement read Danah Boyd’s Great Reckoning speech. In the ways I was complicit and aligned with the patriarchy in tech to advance my career, I have regrets. I’m with Danah. Let’s change the norms.

**That’s change the world for the win.  A win for humanity, ‘k guys?

It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed Yet

You know, that quote about the future already being here. I saw a tweet at the end of last year about an airport in Helsinki that had already gone 5G replete with welcoming robots. All this progress in various stages of 5G planning, rollout, development, and, well, freakout (conversations we were having in back channels) prompted me to wonder if the time was right to revisit the idea of launching a “5G Adoption Council.”  The market conditions were  similar.  At least here in the U.S., they were very similar.

A heck of a lot of change is coming fast to the Enterprise and all I see out there are vendors and high paid experts driving the conversation on what customers should be doing.  Large enterprises can benefit now by sharing notes and intelligence at this early stage of technology transformation.

There’s no better way to learn how to innovate than to learn how to innovate together with your peers, across industries and geographies in a transparent and generous network of like-minded individuals who share  the same values.

If that sounds like fun and something interesting to you, and you work for a large enterprise of more than 10K employees, consider joining us.

We started putting together a team of interested individuals. We’re calling it The 5G Enterprise Council. You need to fill out this form to apply. But, that’s it. We’ve got plans for a variety of programs and learning opportunities, especially for charter members.  If you were a member of The 2.0 Adoption Council, you will appreciate this new and improved Council. Imagine…  we will venture outside of the cloud for field trips!

Everyone says 5G is going to change everything. It is. But it won’t change what happens when a group of people get together to enjoy each other’s company and help each other grow.

Come grow with us into the future.

 

Social Business: Pining for the Fjords!

“I’ll tell you what’s wrong with it…  It’s dead!”

So, which is it dead or not dead?   There is so much confusion in the market about what “Social Business” is, it might as well be a dead parrot (too).  And there is no shortage of people who come at this conversation with a perspective that simply adds more confusion based on their orientation or specific economic agenda.

No one knows this struggle better than I.  I had lost the battle to preserve “Social Business” for its original owner, Muhammad Yunus, who by-the-way is trying to solve global poverty and a Nobel Peace Prize winner, sometime in 2009 in discussions with the social cognoscenti.  My former employer and friends at the Dachis Group had settled on repurposing Social Business to describe the evolving phenomenon, and after I was acquired, I too fell in line eventually rebranding the Council I had created for early adopters of Enterprise 2.0 to become “The Social Business Council.”*   I think the goal had always been to create a singular view for the market, and I supported the direction.  But, even as I was leaving Dachis Group in the summer of 2012, we took a pulse to see how many of the early adopters had fully integrated their internal social collaboration initiatives (collaboration and learning) with their external social media marketing initiatives (sales and marketing), and wished we hadn’t asked.  I knew the number would not be high, but I was literally shocked to see the response was nearly zero.  The actual number was 4%.   The number was so startling that when I presented it at a Jive user’s group meeting here in Texas, people were somewhat alarmed.  So, I repurposed the figure in the report to reflect how many people said they had plans to do it, but currently had not done it.

planets

The reality that surrounds this issue is we are really talking about two different planets that share the same language based on the principles of the early web 2.0 phenomenon and open web.  But, anyone who’s played in both these camps will readily acknowledge that a digital strategist or VP of Consumer Strategy has no idea what social collaboration is inside the enterprise and most likely spends his/her entire day in email, teleconferences, meetings, and ppt.  And, someone who’s running an internal enterprise social network has no idea who the top players are in SMMS (or what that acronym even means).  The problem is becoming somewhat unwieldy, however, because people who do not know better can easily confuse expertise in one area with the other.  Some of the senior enterprise folks in our network are facing career track issues with this right now.  Further, there’s now evidence of attempts at rationalization taking place, trying to shoe-horn the whole shebang into a singular phenomenon.  Nice try, and if it leads to changing the world, we’re for it.

One of our Change Agents, Richard Martin, pointed out that Nilofer Merchant side-stepped the issue quite neatly in her book 11 Rules for Creating Value in the Social Era: “You might wonder why I’m not using Enterprise 2.0 (E2.0) or social business (#socbiz) terminology. Enterprise 2.0 primarily focused on the tools necessary to create information flow, based on the idea that we can do better if we share information freely. Social business (#socbiz) was a term first created by Muhammed Yunus, but more recently has been a popular way to describe the way companies function and generate value for all the constituents (stakeholders, employees, customers, partners, suppliers)—the idea being that we add a social overlay to the existing structural framework. Here, I pose a new question with the notion of Social Era: in what ways can we structure things entirely differently to create more value in the context of our times, to be fast to market, to be fluid in mind-set, to be flexible in how we organize, deliver, and create value?”

She nails it in that “new” question.

We’ll be talking about some of those answers in an upcoming webinar we are doing next week in cooperation with our sponsor partner, Socialcast by VMware. The webinar will provide a reality check on where social is today, but more importantly, will talk about the underlying trends that are driving enterprise-sized businesses to become more network-based and adaptable.  You’ll have the pleasure of listening to thought leaders Simon Terry and Harold Jarche share their insights on why social matters now more than ever before.   Simon will explain how we got here, what the problem is in the market, and Harold will explain ways we can begin to address these problems today.  We’ll cover a few case studies and have lots of time to do Q&A with webinar participants, so please sign up and join us.  We look forward to your participation.

Webinar: Moving Forward with Social Collaboration
Date:  December 12, 2013
Time: 11:00 a.m. EST

 

This webinar kicks off a series of projects we’ll be doing with Socialcast to educate the market.   We have a lot more in store as we roll into 2014 too.  As always, thanks for your support for the great work we’re doing at Change Agents Worldwide.  You can support us by tweeting (@chagww and #caww) about us, liking us on Facebook, following on on G+, joining our public community on G+, and following our updates on LinkedIn.  Of course, don’t be shy about joining us as well.  Things are going to change in 2014 for new members, so if you’ve been considering joining, now would be a good time.

Last thing –  Deloitte and MIT Sloan Management Review are running a fairly good survey on trying to get to the bottom of some of these issues and to mitigate some confusion in the market.  I highly recommend you complete the questionnaire.   We’re also very excited about Change Agent Jane McConnell’s Digital Workplace results which will be out in early 2014, as well.

See you next Thursday!  And, as always, interested in your comments.

 

*Sadly, one thing is deader than a dead parrot: The Social Business Council.  Dachis Group shut it down this month.  It was a great resource for many early adopters and fans, and its legend lives on in the halls of Wikipedia if you’d like to update the page.

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Focusing on Adoption (exclusively) is a Dead-End

For an early adopter market, adoption in this space always seems to get a bad rap.  Why is that?  Because adoption is not the end-game.  It’s the beginning.  In the Council, the members are focused on changing hearts and minds and promoting the use of social tools in order to drive acceptance for a new way of working.  In Deloitte’s excellent report issued today, Social Software for Business Performance, we couldn’t agree more with the findings.  In fact, the rap on “adoption” uses our research to make the point.  There is no benefit in adoption for adoption’s sake.

It’s important to understand that “technology” adoption is the beginning of the journey.  It’s the first wagon wheel turn on a Westward Ho! trek toward complete embrace of a workforce that is socially calibrated and connected.  If you want to experience the benefits of working socially, workforces need to be comfortable and see the benefit of the radical internal organizational change it requires.  It sometimes amuses me that the folks who are critical of the adoption effort required are not particularly proficient in working socially in the first place, and cling to the world they know which is process-oriented and rooted in the industrialization (machining) of the enterprise.

I’ve often said that the adoption story is much less about the technology than it is about the organizational dynamics required to rewire the culture toward a more open, more egalitarian society if you will.  My source on this does not hail from any new technology fad.  In fact, it’s a paper originally published in 1957.  It is a supplement to a paper called, “How Farm People Accept New Ideas.”  It draws from a sociology, not technology foundation.

Introducing these concepts and making them stick inside a large organization is, indeed, a lot like cat-herding.  But, these are not cats or kittens. Change is painful and difficult inside large organizations.  One of the best quotes we heard from last year’s BlackBelt Workshop at the Boston Enterprise 2.0 conference was from one of our members who said, “These are not cats we’re herding; they’re Tigers, and they bite!”

Business process oriented vendors are getting savvy to social.  Council members just had a great Q&A yesterday with SFDC’s Chatter lead, Chuck Ganapathi, yesterday, and we’re planning a demo and conversation with Tibbr in the near future.   My prediction is we will see new business processes that replace or obsolete old ones more and more as, well, adoption proliferates throughout the enterprise.

Social Means Business

I just read Kate’s post on today’s announcement about Dachis Group acquiring Powered.  I had to chuckle, because those of us in that “alternate universe, E20” used to think the same about the social media space.  In fact, I joked to Peter Kim this year at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Santa Clara, “How does it feel not to be a celebrity?”  I feel the same way at SXSWi.  (Truth is, I didn’t even go last year.)

But, Kate is correct, the world is changing and fast.  Every day one of our Council members, who’ve historically come from an E20 orientation – what we at Dachis Group refer to as “Workforce Collaboration” –  is being asked to help out with the enterprise social strategy whether that means social media initiatives, connecting to suppliers, or partners.  Some of our members have relocated entirely out of IT and into Marketing (who wouldda thunk?).  And it’s not just IT and Marketing driving these initiatives, either.  Social is touching every business unit in the organization.

I caution all our members to keep their eye on the bigger picture.  The Council is expanding to embrace all facets of social business.  Going forward, it will not be possible to separate where social media initiatives begin and e20 ends.  And, every customer will tell you they rarely use any jargon when they’re presenting business cases to their executives.  The language they use is rooted in the benefits of social collaboration, not the features.  This is typically different for every company too, and becoming more and more strategic.

This next phase of the evolution of the social business market is about integration.  Social Integration of people, process, and technology.  Integration of Work, Society, and Technology.  Integration of the past with the future.  It’s all good, and it’s why I’m particularly thrilled to be a part of a company executing with precision on that vision.

Social Business on the Ground

When we set out to investigate case studies, we were looking for “slam dunk” examples where 2.0 initiatives were inextricably tied to business results. In effect, we wanted to begin to dispel the criticisms that e20 was just the next silly, narcissistic exploit to enter the enterprise on the heels of yet another consumer fad: web 2.0.

Well?  We didn’t find those “slam dunk” examples. But, neither did we find any “failures.” What we did find was a massive movement shaking the bedrock of enterprise as we know it. The enterprise plates are still firmly in place, but our investigation revealed tremors– sudden energy being released among the employee population that is poised to crack the foundation of business as we’ve known it.

Time and time again we heard, “This is the most important initiative I’ve ever worked on in my professional life.” There’s something chilling, something inspiring about the people and companies who are leading the charge toward reinventing themselves to become socially savvy. As you read through these profiles and cases, you’ll come to appreciate while all of these companies are still early in the process, they all are confident they will succeed in their long term goals.  Some are realizing early successes already.   The prevailing operational mission at present, however, is to succeed at catalyzing the “ideological reformation” at the root level of the organization that needs to take place before real business value can be extracted, measured, and fine-tuned.  It’s a bit of a Catch-22, and almost as maddening and dangerous as originally described in the novel that coined the phrase.

We will continue to track the progress of these early adopters.  Regardless where you are in the spectrum, we all succeed when every case succeeds.  We’d like to thank IBM and MIT’s Center for Digital Business for lending support and sponsorship to this series of cases and profiles. Special thanks to all @20adoption members who participated in the series.

Current profiles and cases are posted on The 2.0 Adoption Council web site.  Feel free to download at will.  We have a few more coming, as well.